Publications

Food Science Extension Publications
Canning Fruit
(FDNS-E-43-01)
When fruits are canned, they are heated hot enough and long enough to destroy spoilage organisms. This heating (or processing) also stops the action of enzymes that can spoil food quality. Because fruits have a high acid content, processing can be done in a boiling water bath canner or in a pressure canner. This publication provides information on equipment and materials needed for canning fruit as well as instructions for before, after, and during the preservation process. Preparation methods and processing times for specific fruits are also given. For more information on food preservation, visit the National Center for Home Food Preservation online at http://nchfp.uga.edu.
Canning Tomatoes and Tomato Products
(FDNS-E-43-02)
When tomatoes are canned, they are heated hot enough and long enough to destroy organisms that can make people sick in addition to spoilage organisms. Tomatoes are treated as an acid food for canning purposes. Many tomato products may be safely canned in a boiling water canner. However, because some tomatoes can be slightly low-acid for canning purposes, added acid is required in the boiling water canning of plain tomatoes, juice and sauce. This publication provides directions for canning a variety of tomato products as well as the equipment and procedures necessary for this type of food preparation. For more information on food preservation, visit the National Center for Home Food Preservation online at http://nchfp.uga.edu.
Canning Vegetables
(FDNS-E-43-03)
Pressure canning is the only safe method of canning all vegetables (except tomatoes). The Clostridium botulinum microorganism is the main reason pressure canning is necessary. This publication provides directions on how to safely preserve specific vegetables with a pressure canner. Information on equipment, preparation, and processing are given, as well as information on how to guard against spoilage. For more information on food preservation, visit the National Center for Home Food Preservation online at http://nchfp.uga.edu.
Pickled Products
(FDNS-E-43-07)
Pickled products add spice to meals and snacks. The skillful blending of spices, sugar and vinegar with fruits and vegetables gives crisp, firm texture and pungent, sweet-sour flavor. Various types of pickle products can be made depending on the ingredients used and the methods of preparation. This publication covers the ingredients, equipment and procedures necessary for proper pickling. Recipes for a variety of pickled products are also included. For more information on food preservation, visit the National Center for Home Food Preservation online at http://nchfp.uga.edu.
Jams and Jellies
(FDNS-E-43-08)
Sweet spreads—butters, jellies, jams, conserves, marmalades and preserves—add zest to meals. All contain the four essential ingredients needed to make a jellied fruit product–fruit, pectin, acid and sugar. They differ, however, depending upon fruit used, proportion of different ingredients, method of preparation and density of the fruit pulp. This publication deals with the basics of making jellies and jams, without adding pectin. Information on ingredients, equipment, and the canning process are provided in this publication. Recipes for jellies and jams are also included. For more information on food preservation, visit the National Center for Home Food Preservation online at http://nchfp.uga.edu.
Uncooked Jams and Jellies
(FDNS-E-43-09)
Uncooked jams and jellies are easy to prepare and have a fresh fruit taste. They can be made from most fresh or frozen fruits or fruit juices. The other ingredients needed are commercial pectin, sugar and in some cases, lemon juice. After the gel has formed, uncooked jams and jellies can be kept up to three weeks in a refrigerator or up to a year in a freezer. This publication provides instructions for uncooked jams and jellies as well as several recipes. For more information on food preservation, visit the National Center for Home Food Preservation online at http://nchfp.uga.edu.
Freezing Prepared Foods
(FDNS-E-43-14)
Foods for packed lunches or elaborate dinners can be kept in your freezer ready for busy days, parties or unexpected company. By planning a steady flow of casseroles, main dishes, baked goods and desserts in and out of your freezer, you can make good use of your freezer and good use of your time. This publication provides information on preparing to freeze, packaging, and storage. It also provides specific directions for freezing a variety of prepared foods. For more information on food preservation, visit the National Center for Home Food Preservation online at http://nchfp.uga.edu.
How to Convert an Inorganic Fertilizer Recommendation to an Organic One
(C 853)
Many farmers and gardeners use natural minerals and organic fertilizers rather than synthetic ones to build their soil. If you use organic materials as all or part of your fertilization program, this publication will help you calculate the proper amount to use from the recommendations provided by a soil test.
Troubleshooting Salmonella in Poultry Processing Plants: Case Studies
(B 1310)
This publication provides suggestions regarding the proper tuning of a poultry processing plant to meet the USDA-FSIS standards for Salmonella levels, regardless of incoming Salmonella levels.
Preventing Salmonella Colonization of Chickens: Electrostatic Application of Electrolyzed Oxidative Acidic Water
(B 1313)
Electrolyzed oxidative water applied using electrostatic spraying is an effective means of eliminating pathogenic and indicator populations of bacteria from hatching eggs. Using this method in a pilot scale hatchery, the percentage of chickens that were colonized with Salmonella was dramatically reduced. These studies demonstrate that the use of EO water in combination with electrostatic spraying may provide a practical and inexpensive way for the industry to significantly lower the number of birds that arrive at the processing plant contaminated with Salmonella.
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