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This Southeastern Myotis is one of the 16 bat species that live in Georgia. CAES News
Bat Week
Bats may have a reputation for being spooky, but UGA researchers say a world without bats would be absolutely terrifying.
Uprooted pecan tree in Tift County due to Hurricane Michael.

10-11-18 CAES News
Ag Disaster Meeting
All farmers with crops and commodities affected by Hurricane Michael are invited to attend an agriculture disaster assistance information session to be held at the University of Georgia Tifton Campus Conference Center at 2 p.m. Monday, October 22.
Peanut harvest will be delayed this year because of Hurricane Michael and the damage to buying points and shellers in South Georgia. CAES News
Georgia Peanut Crop
Georgia peanut farmers, still reeling from the effects of Hurricane Michael on October 10-11, are facing uncertainty about when and where to unload their crop after harvest, says University of Georgia Cooperative Extension peanut agronomist Scott Monfort.
High winds from Hurricane Michael in Turner County, Georgia, blew cotton to the ground. CAES News
Georgia Cotton Crop
What was an extremely promising Georgia cotton crop was devastated when Hurricane Michael ravaged south Georgia Oct. 10-11. According to Jared Whitaker, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension cotton agronomist, the prospects of 1,500 to 1,800 pounds of dryland cotton for some producers were reduced, resulting in 80 to 90 percent losses in some fields.
University of Georgia Cooperative Extension agents Nan Bostick (left) and Lindsey Hayes (right) tour one of Rob Cohen's (center) pecan orchards in Decatur County, Georgia. CAES News
Hurricane Michael Totals
Hurricane Michael blew across southwest Georgia on Oct. 10, causing at least $3 billion in losses to the state’s agriculture industry, according to early estimates from University of Georgia Cooperative Extension agricultural economists and Extension agents.
Some farms experienced close to 90 percent loss of their vegetable crops last week when Hurricane Michael tore through southwestern Georgia. 
In this Grady County field, the wind lodged plants and defoliated them, exposing the peppers to sun damage. CAES News
Vegetable Damage
With the state’s late summer and fall vegetable crop close to harvest, Georgia vegetable farmers estimate more than $480 million in losses from Hurricane Michael.
When it comes to staying hydrated, water remains the best choice. University of Georgia Cooperative Extension experts say electrolyte replacement drinks are usually only needed if you participate in intense, strenuous activity for more than 90 minutes. CAES News
Emergency Water
Most Americans take for granted having fresh, clean water to drink, but that valuable resource isn’t guaranteed during times of emergency. University of Georgia Cooperative Extension expert Gary Hawkins says, no matter whether your drinking water comes from a private well or a municipal source, having an emergency supply of water is something everyone should have.
A Joro spider found in Hoschton, Georgia in 2018. CAES News
Joro Spiders
If northeast Georgia yards seem a little extra spooky this Halloween season, there’s a good reason. They may have a little extra help from a new neighbor who is really into those cobweb decorations. 
Winds from Tropical Storm Irma uprooted a tree on the lawn of the United Bank in Griffin, Georgia. CAES News
Hurricane Michael
Hurricanes, tropical storms and severe rainfall events are commonly seen among states in the Southeast U.S. These natural events most often occur during summer or early fall and may cause severe problems for urban and agricultural areas of Georgia. As of this week, it appears that we have another hurricane poised to strike Georgia. University of Georgia Cooperative Extension wants all of its agents — and the fruit, vegetable and nut growers they serve — to be as prepared as possible for the effects of the storm.
Wildlife management efforts on small acreage are not in vain. These plots may not forever hold a flock of turkeys, a covey of quail, or a trophy buck, but they often become important parts of these animals' range. The photo of this buck was taken by a wildlife camera on a 7-acre lot. CAES News
Managing Wildlife
While implementing habitat improvements on a small property can provide homes to small mammals, songbirds, reptiles and amphibians, the home ranges of large mammals and several birds often encapsulate several hundred acres.