Publications

Food Science Extension Publications
Food Hubs in Georgia: A Potential Market for Small-Scale and Midscale Farms
(B 1488)
In Georgia, there are many small-scale producers that largely use ecological production practices, such as Certified Organic, and sell in farmers markets or other direct marketing channels. As these direct markets begin to saturate, these producers may need to forge a path beyond direct markets to wholesale or institutional markets that want sustainable products. Food hubs may offer a path for these small farms to scale up. There are three overlapping forms of food hubs in Georgia. Each has different markets and thus different requirements for the producers who sell to them. This publication discusses the types of food hubs in Georgia and gives producers guidelines on which form of food hub may work best for them.
Country Cured Ham
(B 1526)
Country cured hams are considered a delicacy and are widely accepted by Georgians. Our forefathers cured country hams during the winter months in order to have a summer supply of meat. Country hams, properly cured, develop a distinct flavor during aging. Modern methods of curing and aging country hams are somewhat different from the methods used 50 to 100 years ago. The loss of meat due to spoilage is much less when it is cured under controlled refrigeration and aged under controlled environmental conditions for uniform quality. With a continued demand for country cured hams, there are more establishments being constructed. Country cured hams and bacon are a major source of income in many rural communities in our state. Cured pork valued at many thousands of dollars is lost each year in Georgia due to improper curing and storage. Refrigeration, either by machinery or from our normal weather conditions in the fall and winter, is essential in a ham curing operation. Sometimes the latter is not dependable and may cause ham spoilage. The method of curing described in this publication can be applied to on-the-farm curing for family use or for commercial ham operations. It is not difficult to cure pork if a few basic principles in curing, salt equalization, and aging are closely observed.
Healthy Breakfast Feeds the Brain
(C 1037-07)
Read about the connection between a healthy breakfast and children's learning, and work with your child to make a fruit smoothie for breakfast.
How Much Water Should You Drink?
(C 1037-02)
Find out how much water you should drink to stay hydrated, and help children make drinking water more fun by making colored fruit ice cubes.
A Variety of Foods for Picky Eaters
(C 1037-16)
Read tips for helping picky eaters try new foods, and play a food finder game with your child on your next grocery shopping trip.
Managing Organic Refuse: Options for Green Industry Professionals
(C 982)
This publication explains some of the options available to Green Industry professionals for dealing with these organic materials.
Organic Vidalia Onion Production
(C 913)
This publication discusses organic Vidalia onion production in Georgia, from site selection and harvesting to certification.
Amino Acid Content in Organic Soybean Meal for the Formulation of Organic Poultry Feed
(C 1140)
Amino acids are essential building blocks of proteins and are obtained from plant and animal products. Some amino acids can be synthesized by the chicken, while others (essential amino acids) must be supplied in the diet. In organic poultry production, the sources of these essential amino acids must be organic. This publication compares the amino acid content, digestibility, and availability of organic soybean meal with conventional soybean meal.
2005 Georgia Plant Disease Loss Estimates
(SB 41-08)
It is estimated that 2005 plant disease losses, including control costs, amounted to approximately $537.44 million. The value of the crops used in this estimate was approximately $4377.6 million, resulting in a 12.28 percent total disease loss across all crops included in this summary.
2003 Georgia Plant Disease Loss Estimates
(SB 41-06)
It is estimated that 2003 plant disease losses, including control costs, amounted to approximately $682.67 million. The value of the crops used in this estimate was approximately $5.399 billion, resulting in a 12.64 percent total disease loss across all crops included in this summary.
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